This category contains 14 posts

Risk appetite – a bad idea

It’s a truism that you can’t do anything – or even nothing – without taking risk.  This is an important issue for all organisations, but the discussion of what risk to take has become unnecessarily obscured.  Specifically it has become bogged down in the unhelpful concept of ‘risk appetite’ and this has added to the […]

Complexity, cockroaches and building resilience

The near collapse of the financial system was fairly widely predicted though the political community is somewhat in denial about that. What was less widely foreseen was that it would happen in September 2008: it was a risk waiting to materialise as we risk geeks say. Two authors with a gold-plated prediction record on this, […]

The end of cycles

Here’s something that I’ve taken from a blog I did on how decisions are taken in public life and the role of media in supporting them (or not). Economists have laboured for years to model the behaviour of markets.  The models have become ever more complex and contain ever more parameters to help fitting the results to […]

Organisational risk taking – a simple view

At the core of organisational risk management lies the question of what risks to run.  You know the organisation cannot achieve its purpose with certainty.  You know you can take steps to control risk – to some extent.  You know that your chance of success will be improved if you seek out and grasp opportunities.  And you think […]